The Hypocrisy of “Helping” the Poor

 

 

outsourcing picMore and more corporations are moving jobs overseas to fatten their wallets.  CEO’s of these companies know what they’re doing when they pack their corporate Coach bags and give the American worker the old heave ho. “The grass is greener on the other side of the pond, oh wait, that’s just my bank account.”, they might say.

 

 

This recent article, http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/04/opinion/sunday/the-hypocrisy-of-helping-the-poor.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share&_r=0, explains how these corporate big wigs try to save face by “giving back” to the less fortunate and trying to lift people out of poverty. If they do give to charities, it’s only after they have made millions of dollars in profit from outsourcing American jobs.  What they really should be doing is taking a big hard look in the mirror and seeing that a majority of the time, they are the reason these people are impoverished in the first place.

So you might ask, what countries are benefiting the most from this exodus of jobs out of the U.S.?  And the winner is….CHINA!  If you’re reading this on your i-Phone while taking a walk around town in your new Air Jordan’s, chances are you’re contributing more to China’s economy then you are to our own.  China employs sweat-shops to manufacture their products and they pay their workers horrendous wages.  In doing so, their workers suffer and the executives of these companies reap all of the profits. But if you ask Nike’s co-founder, Phil Knight, he’ll tell you one of the reasons he moved his factories out of the U.S. was for the “uplifting of impoverished people”, as the linked article states.

Yeah right Phil, and pigs can fly.

The author describes a trip he took into the Deep South visiting small towns where it was all too common to see factories shut down and little to no jobs available.  These folks were reliant on large companies such as Fruit of the Loom, Schwinn, and others to sustain their livelihood because most of the work they had prior involved manual labor that had been replaced by machinery.  When these companies left, they were devastated and desperate for jobs to keep their family afloat.  I am sure that this is not an uncommon story throughout the U.S.  It’s time for the CEO’s to stop padding their pockets and bring jobs back to America!

Kevin Hayes

 

 

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